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Slender Meadow Katydid

Slender Meadow Katydid (Conocephalus fasciatus)

Occurrence

Common to abundant in appropriate habitat.

Habitat

Grassy meadows, wetland edges.

Range

All counties in NE Ohio

Physical description

As its name implies, this meadow katydid appears long and slender, especially when compared with the Short-winged Meadow Katydid with which it may be found. Slender Meadow Katydids are green with long, light brown wings and bright green cerci. The female’s ovipositor is slender and straight. The Slender Meadow Katydid’s colors and physical profile helps it blend beautifully with grasses.

Slender Meadow Katydid male's green cerci
Slender Meadow Katydid female's ovipositor

Song

Very high, soft tics and whirrs. The song is even more difficult to hear than that of the Short-winged Meadow Katydid. They sing in the afternoon and at night.

Slender Meadow Katydid - Recording by Lisa Rainsong and Wendy Partridge
00:00 / 00:00

Adult season

They mature earlier than Short-winged Meadow Katydids and can be found from the third week of July until frost.

General description and context

These little katydids are not very easy to find, as they look like part of a blade of grass. If you find one, however, you may notice several more nearby. Like the Short-wingeds, they will climb up high in tall grasses to dine on seeds after dark. Although they can hide very well when stretched out along a blade of grass or grass stem, their long antennae may give them away.

Similar species

Short-winged Meadow Katydids are often found with the Slender Meadow Katydids, but Short-wingeds typically have short wings and their abdomens will be dark yellow or orange and the end. This will be true even for the long-winged form of the Short-winged Meadow Katydid, while the Slender’s abdomen will be entirely green

Field observation

Slender Meadow Katydids use their long wings to occasionally fly short distances, which will become immediately apparent if you try to catch one.

 

Listening in Nature post:

http://listeninginnature.blogspot.com/2015/08/small-slender-and-elegant.html

 

Songs of Insects:

http://songsofinsects.com/katydids/slender-meadow-katydid

 

Singing Insects of North America:

http://www.entnemdept.ufl.edu/walker/buzz/231a.htm